Reviews, Uncategorized

Review: We need to talk about Kevin by Lionel Shriver

This is a book I've put off reading for a long time. In fact, I saw the movie with Tilda Swinton before I was brave enough to read the book. That's just the way my mind works, because, for whatever reason, I'm always convinced that the book is going to be better. And I was right.… Continue reading Review: We need to talk about Kevin by Lionel Shriver

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Blogging, Reading, Reviews

Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks Challenge Update!

Now we are in the fifteen-week of the year, I wanted to do a brief update on where I am on the Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks Challenge. Have I read the target of fifteen books? Ha! I'm only four books behind. So far this year, I've read: The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde… Continue reading Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks Challenge Update!

Event, Fiction, London, Reviews, Writing

Why Hamilton is Genius

Since I saw Hamilton at the Alexandra Palace and posted my review, I’ve been having many and various fun arguments with friends and fellow musical theatre lovers as to why this is probably one of the greatest musicals in the last twenty years. I’ve seen some amazing new musicals like Groundhog Day and Matilda, but… Continue reading Why Hamilton is Genius

Non-Fiction, Reviews

Review: The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

This is another historical nonfiction novel by Erik Larson, who's really a wonderful writer in this genre. This book I listened to on audiobook and in retrospect, I'm glad I did. It's pretty dense and I imagine can be difficult to plough through. The Devil in the White City follows the lives of two men.… Continue reading Review: The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

Event, London, Reviews, Theatre

Review: Hamilton

This Saturday, I saw Hamilton at the Victoria Palace. I’ve been dying to see it since it opened on Broadway in 2015. The hype of its arrival in London has been infectious and I was trying desperately not to be too excited, worried it wouldn’t live up to the incredible praise it’s received. After all,… Continue reading Review: Hamilton

Fiction, Literature, Reading, Reviews, Writing

Never Underestimate… the Igor

This is technically part two of my Frankenstein post which I published here on Friday in honour of the 200th anniversary of this book. But there was so much to talk about with this particular character, I thought he deserved a Never Underestimate post! Something I’ve always found fascinating about Frankenstein’s many and various adaptations… Continue reading Never Underestimate… the Igor

Fiction, London, Reading, Reviews

It’s the 200th Anniversary of Frankenstein

Monday marked the 200th year anniversary of the book Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, was published anonymously on 1st January 1818. It was famously born from a dream and written for a ‘ghost story challenge’ at the Villa Diodati in the summer of 1816 in the company of Lord Byron, Percy… Continue reading It’s the 200th Anniversary of Frankenstein

Event, London, Reviews

Review: Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie

Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie is currently playing at the London County Hall near Waterloo station. I managed to get a seat high in the gallery and thoroughly enjoyed the evening. Leonard Vole, a young, good-looking and mild-mannered man is arrested for the murder of Emily French, a wealthy older woman. Already, you… Continue reading Review: Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie

Reviews, Television

Top 10# Female Heroes of Television

Spoilers ahead for several series so beware! River Song in Doctor Who (played by Alex Kingston) There are so many amazing female characters in Doctor Who that it was a difficult choice, but River Song is a force of nature. As well as being a foil for the Doctor, an almost impossible feat as the man… Continue reading Top 10# Female Heroes of Television

Reading, Reviews

Review: The Astonishing Return of Norah Wells by Virginia MacGregor

As I am ever behind the times, this is a book I've wanted to read since it came out in 2016. Finally! The Astonishing Return of Norah Wells written by Virginia MacGregor revolves around a family and the turmoil that is kicked up when the titular character, mother Norah, returns after six years of absence. Father… Continue reading Review: The Astonishing Return of Norah Wells by Virginia MacGregor

Movies, Reviews, Writing

Top 10# Female Heroes of Movies

Spoilers ahead for several movies so beware! Ellen Ripley from the Alien movies (by Sigourney Weaver) Ellen Ripley is probably one of my favourite characters of all times and is one of the first true kickass heroines. It's perhaps unfortunate that the reason for this is Ripley was originally written as a man. But I think… Continue reading Top 10# Female Heroes of Movies

Event, London, Reviews, Theatre

The Cloak and Dagger Tour Review

I've got a slightly different kind of review for you all today. Last week, my writing group the London Writers' Cafe arranged for us to all go on The Cloak and Dagger Tour. Now, I've always considered myself a history nut. With my degree in the Classics, my amateur research into the nineteenth century and my general fascination… Continue reading The Cloak and Dagger Tour Review

Literature, Reviews

Review: My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier

Ever late to the party, this is one of the classics which I haven't read before. The Book Club I go to decided on My Cousin Rachel this month, partly due to the film now being in cinemas. I'm one of those people who hate seeing a movie based on a book without having read the… Continue reading Review: My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier

Literature, Movies, Reviews, Writing

The Bechdel–Wallace test and how it can help us

I briefly spoke about the Bechdel–Wallace test in my post about complex and powerful female characters, which you can read here. But as it's such an interesting idea, I wanted to talk about it in depth. The Bechdel–Wallace test was created by the American cartoonist Alison Bechdel. It first appeared in 1985 in her comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For.  Basically… Continue reading The Bechdel–Wallace test and how it can help us

Authors, Non-Fiction, Reviews, Writing

John Finnemore, the spinner of tales

John Finnemore is one of the best comedy writers currently working. He mostly writes for radio and created Cabin Pressure, John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme, and Double Acts. His true talent is one all good writers should aspire to; he invites you to listen to his story, holds your attention for as long as he's asked… Continue reading John Finnemore, the spinner of tales

Authors, Fiction, Literature, Reading, Reviews, Writing

Not all Classics are created equal

Does anyone find that they the story, but not necessarily the book? Those occasions where a story transcends its source material to take on a life of its own. Perhaps you like West Side Story, but you’d never read Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Perhaps you love Bridget Jones’s Diary, but would never read Jane Austen's… Continue reading Not all Classics are created equal

Authors, Fiction, Literature, Reading, Reviews

5 books which have influenced me

The Kingfisher Book of Myths and Legends by Anthony Horowitz You know those treasured books which have been with you forever? This is one of my earliest and most beloved books. Back in Primary school, I was a bit of a mystery to my teachers. My reading age was significantly higher than my spelling age, which made… Continue reading 5 books which have influenced me

Authors, Literature, Non-Fiction, Reading, Reviews

When you forget how to read

Around the beginning of 2016, something awful happened. I stopped reading. I wasn't sure why, but I couldn't pick up a book anymore. I've been an avid reader my whole life and it was pretty startling to realise that three months, four months, six months had gone by without me opening a new book. In retrospect, there were… Continue reading When you forget how to read

Literature, London, Reading, Reviews

Forget the idiom, we DO judge a book by its cover

The Guardian published the article How real books have trumped ebooks celebrating the recent and hopefully continued uptick in sales of physical books over ebooks. In this article, James Daunt, the chief executive of Waterstones makes a wonderful point about selling books: A very large part of the way I sell books has been about how you… Continue reading Forget the idiom, we DO judge a book by its cover

Fiction, Movies, Reviews, Writing

Moana: could she be the best Disney princess?

Some of you out there may be Dinsey nuts. Some of you may be Dinsey haters. Some may think Disney is for children, some of you may have had Disney themed weddings. But regardless, Disney is important, shaping the minds of children. And since 1937 with 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' it has been… Continue reading Moana: could she be the best Disney princess?

Fiction, Reviews, Television, Writing

Mad, bad and dangerous to know

A friend recently got me into Rick and Morty. I couldn't believe how much I enjoyed it as it's not usually my style of comedy. Massive amounts of toilet humour, pointedly politically incorrect and incredibly near the knuckle themes - this is not a cartoon for children. Nothing's held sacred and everything's a target of… Continue reading Mad, bad and dangerous to know

Authors, Non-Fiction, Reviews, Writing

Should we just give up writing?

Two weeks into blogging and I'm already talking about giving up? No not really. In early April, the Guardian online published the opinion article What I’m really thinking: the failed novelist. An anonymous writer bemoans the fact that her two novels were rejected by various editors. Since then, she's 'given up', can't bring herself to read any… Continue reading Should we just give up writing?

Fiction, Literature, Reviews, Theatre, Writing

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern… what happens when you give minor characters their own play

Recently I was lucky enough to see Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead with Joshua McGuire and Daniel Radcliffe at the Old Vic. This is one of my all time favourite plays and has been for a long time. I'm a true Shakespeare nut, to the point where I literally flinch if a line is missed in Much… Continue reading Rosencrantz and Guildenstern… what happens when you give minor characters their own play

Art, Authors, Blogging, Fiction, Literature, Movies, Non-Fiction, Quotes, Reviews, Television, Theatre, Writing

I’m going to start a blog. How hard can it be?

I've been creating stories for as long as I can remember. As a child, I would borrow my father's video camera and tell stories, often with props but always bossing around my younger sister (aka the lead actress and stagehand) and my impressive range of made up words like 'blustery-er'. It wasn't until I was eleven… Continue reading I’m going to start a blog. How hard can it be?