Fiction, Television

GoT Theory – Tyrion’s Pact with the Devil

What was Tyrion thinking? I think I know. Here's a post from my new sci-fi/fantasy blog. If Game of Thrones, Harry Potter, Star Wars, Star Terk and anything fantastical is your thing, you should consider following me by clicking here! Follow Melanie Roussel Fiction on WordPress.com In September Entertainment Weekly released an interview with Peter Dinklage about… Continue reading GoT Theory – Tyrion’s Pact with the Devil

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Fiction, Writing

Where do you get your ideas from?

The eternal question asked by and of writers. Where do you get your ideas from? In response to this frequently asked question, the divine Neil Gaiman has said: 'I make them up,' I tell them. 'Out of my head.' Well, obviously. Whatever we do and say, odds are, it probably originated from out of our heads.… Continue reading Where do you get your ideas from?

Fiction, Literature, Reading

Should we care about the top 100 books?

Once a year, a list like this gets published. 100 books to read before you die. 100 books you should read. 100 books that changed the world. You know the sort. Last Monday, the BBC published their latest version of this on the culture website. 100 Stories that Shaped the World. And every time I see one… Continue reading Should we care about the top 100 books?

Fiction, Reading, Writing

Are eBooks Stupid?

This week, the Guardian ran a quote from Arnaud Nourry, chief executive of Hachette Livre, saying that ebooks are “a stupid product” which have "no creativity" and have so far only had "one or two successes among a hundred failures."  If you haven't heard of them, Hachette is currently the world's third largest trade publisher so we… Continue reading Are eBooks Stupid?

Event, Fiction, London, Reviews, Writing

Why Hamilton is Genius

Since I saw Hamilton at the Alexandra Palace and posted my review, I’ve been having many and various fun arguments with friends and fellow musical theatre lovers as to why this is probably one of the greatest musicals in the last twenty years. I’ve seen some amazing new musicals like Groundhog Day and Matilda, but… Continue reading Why Hamilton is Genius

Fiction, Literature, Reading, Reviews, Writing

Never Underestimate… the Igor

This is technically part two of my Frankenstein post which I published here on Friday in honour of the 200th anniversary of this book. But there was so much to talk about with this particular character, I thought he deserved a Never Underestimate post! Something I’ve always found fascinating about Frankenstein’s many and various adaptations… Continue reading Never Underestimate… the Igor

Fiction, London, Reading, Reviews

It’s the 200th Anniversary of Frankenstein

Monday marked the 200th year anniversary of the book Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, was published anonymously on 1st January 1818. It was famously born from a dream and written for a ‘ghost story challenge’ at the Villa Diodati in the summer of 1816 in the company of Lord Byron, Percy… Continue reading It’s the 200th Anniversary of Frankenstein

Fiction, Literature, Television, Writing

Never underestimate… the Iago.

How can you tell if your favourite character is, in fact, a manipulative bastard? This character, for me, will forever be judged against the standards of Shakespeare's Iago. Has your character manipulated his friend into a bar brawl so he gets demoted? Convinced his wife to steal a handkerchief he later plants on said friend… Continue reading Never underestimate… the Iago.

Fiction, Literature, Movies, Reading, Television, Writing

Never underestimate… the Watsons

I recently finished reading The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah. If you don't know, this is Sophie Hannah taking on the continuation novels of Agatha Christie's beloved Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. Approved by the Christie Estate and written by a very talent crime novelist who I had the chance to meet at Swanwick Summer Writing School.… Continue reading Never underestimate… the Watsons

Fiction, Literature, Writing

Your most valuable tool: But why?

What's the most valuable tool you have as a writer? That's right, it's the 'Write your way to Success' app available on iPhone and Android for the reasonable price of £19.99. Get this app and you too could be the next Stephen King in four to six months. That's right, it's the 'Write your way… Continue reading Your most valuable tool: But why?

Authors, Fiction, Literature, Writing

Rules are fun! Rules help CONTROL the fun.

How many articles or books listing ‘writing rules’ have you read? How many have you read saying that you should break them? Many of you may recognise the title of this post if you’re ever watched, Friends. Rules are fun! Rules help control the fun. The Guardian has an entire page of writing rules from authors like… Continue reading Rules are fun! Rules help CONTROL the fun.

Fiction, Literature, Writing

First draft hangover. What have we learnt?

After four years mulling and a year writing, I have now finished the first draft of my steampunk novel. Whew! I have mixed feelings on it all. It most certainly isn't a masterpiece. There are plot holes, too much telling than showing and a lack of cohesiveness which makes it feel more like a string… Continue reading First draft hangover. What have we learnt?

Fiction, Literature, Movies, Writing

Are your characters victims or dodgers of karmic justice?

Fiction is written by us. And what we like to see, what we cling to, is the sense that the universe will eventually fix everything. Whether that’s a god, fate or narrative causality, bad people get their comeuppance and good people get rewarded. And when we see terrible characters undergo terrible deaths, it’s okay, even… Continue reading Are your characters victims or dodgers of karmic justice?

Fiction, Literature, Reading, Writing

Top 10# Female Heroes of Literature

Elizabeth Bennet by Jane Austen (as depicted here by Jennifer Ehle) One of my favourite heroines. Elizabeth Bennet is a character who has echoed down the ages purely because of how human she is. She's not at all perfect, laden with pride (and prejudice, surprisingly...), refuses to be stereotyped or dedicated to, but remains a woman… Continue reading Top 10# Female Heroes of Literature

Fiction, Literature, Writing

Without hesitation, repetition or deviation

We've all been there. We see a competition for a short story and we're suddenly inspired by the topic. Clearly, cognitive dissonance has already set in, because on some level we know we're going to hate it by the time we've written it. But at the first rush of feeling, ideas like fireworks are lighting your… Continue reading Without hesitation, repetition or deviation

Fiction, Literature, Movies, Reading, Television, Writing

STRONG female characters? How about we just write better.

This is a post I'd been working on for about two weeks before the new Doctor was announced, which I wrote about last week. I bumped up this post today as I think it ties in well about our changing view of female characters. Strong female characters, or the lack thereof, has been a hot… Continue reading STRONG female characters? How about we just write better.

Blogging, Fiction, Writing

Cast off your crutches

I'd be the first to say I'm a naturally apologetic person. I tend to apologise that I'm so apologetic. I'm the person who apologises when someone steps on my foot on the tube. And I don't think there's anything wrong with that, but I've come to realise that it's killing my writing. Everything I wrote… Continue reading Cast off your crutches

Fiction, Games, Writing

Harnessing the Completion Principle to enthral and annoy your readers

This has happened to me and I'm sure it's happened to you. Let's say you've been to see a movie and now you're walking home. The movie was okay, maybe even great! But there was some missing piece which is starting to bug you. 'Well, how did the McGuffin work?' or, 'But why did the… Continue reading Harnessing the Completion Principle to enthral and annoy your readers

Authors, Fiction, Literature, Reading, Reviews, Writing

Not all Classics are created equal

Does anyone find that they the story, but not necessarily the book? Those occasions where a story transcends its source material to take on a life of its own. Perhaps you like West Side Story, but you’d never read Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Perhaps you love Bridget Jones’s Diary, but would never read Jane Austen's… Continue reading Not all Classics are created equal

Fiction, Literature, Uncategorized

Give your character some good old fashion vices

My degree was Classical Studies - Ancient Greeks and Romans. And a lot of what I learned shaped my understanding of literature. You’d be amazed at how much influence 5th-century Athenian literature has had on us, from tragedy to comedy. And probably the most famous know-it-alls of all time, Aristotle, still has a lot to teach… Continue reading Give your character some good old fashion vices

Authors, Fiction, Literature, Reading, Reviews

5 books which have influenced me

The Kingfisher Book of Myths and Legends by Anthony Horowitz You know those treasured books which have been with you forever? This is one of my earliest and most beloved books. Back in Primary school, I was a bit of a mystery to my teachers. My reading age was significantly higher than my spelling age, which made… Continue reading 5 books which have influenced me

Fiction, Literature, Writing

The Busy Bee

The Busy Bee The busy bee, bright brown and yellow, Flits from flower to flower in industrial glee, With not a care in the world. Just like my neighbour, Mrs Cassidy. The busy bee, ungainly and urgent, Buzzes and bounces against glass panes, Knocking and fussing. Just like my neighbour, Mrs Cassidy. I should probably… Continue reading The Busy Bee

Fiction, Literature, Television, Writing

This post was six weeks away from retirement

Ah, cliché. That old unwanted friend who turns up at your party, but you've known them forever and it's too much effort to get them to leave. Terry Pratchett summarised it best: Clichés are the hammer and screwdriver in the toolbox of communication. Read any 'how to write' guide and they'll tell you that clichés… Continue reading This post was six weeks away from retirement

Authors, Fiction, Literature, Movies, Reading, Television, Writing

Is there too much flashing in modern literature?

Flashbacks and flashforwards. Why, what did you think I meant? Flashbacks and flashforwards have become a significant part of the language of modern fiction. I hadn't thought too much about until this weekend when I saw the Guardian article Bad memories: Colm Tóibín urges authors to lose the flashbacks. At the Hay Festival last weekend, Colm Tóibín,… Continue reading Is there too much flashing in modern literature?

Fiction, Literature, Writing

Remember these four elements of good storytelling

Pick up any two guides to writing, or check out any number of blogs and you'll see 'the X elements of good story telling'. These range from three to twelve or more. And all of them are different. Hum. It's almost as though storytelling is a subjective art... I spend a lot of time picking… Continue reading Remember these four elements of good storytelling

Fiction, Non-Fiction, Writing

Fake News. Probably the most successful fiction there is

Did you know that during President Donald Trump’s campaign, he offered to pay for one-way plane tickets of anyone of African or Mexican descent wanting to leave America? Well no, he didn’t. But this article by tmzhiphop.com got 802,000 reactions online. Why does fake news have such a readership? Why did an article in thevalleyreport.com… Continue reading Fake News. Probably the most successful fiction there is

Fiction, Movies, Reviews, Writing

Moana: could she be the best Disney princess?

Some of you out there may be Dinsey nuts. Some of you may be Dinsey haters. Some may think Disney is for children, some of you may have had Disney themed weddings. But regardless, Disney is important, shaping the minds of children. And since 1937 with 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' it has been… Continue reading Moana: could she be the best Disney princess?

Fiction, Reviews, Television, Writing

Mad, bad and dangerous to know

A friend recently got me into Rick and Morty. I couldn't believe how much I enjoyed it as it's not usually my style of comedy. Massive amounts of toilet humour, pointedly politically incorrect and incredibly near the knuckle themes - this is not a cartoon for children. Nothing's held sacred and everything's a target of… Continue reading Mad, bad and dangerous to know

Fiction, Literature, Reviews, Theatre, Writing

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern… what happens when you give minor characters their own play

Recently I was lucky enough to see Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead with Joshua McGuire and Daniel Radcliffe at the Old Vic. This is one of my all time favourite plays and has been for a long time. I'm a true Shakespeare nut, to the point where I literally flinch if a line is missed in Much… Continue reading Rosencrantz and Guildenstern… what happens when you give minor characters their own play

Fiction, London, Writing

Where to find your characters

I've always been a people watcher. You see or overhear a snippet of a conversation, you see a little slice of that person's life. Those of us with an active imagination will know that it can be enough to spark a story. Or ten. Orson Scott Card, the author of Ender's Game once said: Everybody walks past… Continue reading Where to find your characters

Art, Authors, Blogging, Fiction, Literature, Movies, Non-Fiction, Quotes, Reviews, Television, Theatre, Writing

I’m going to start a blog. How hard can it be?

I've been creating stories for as long as I can remember. As a child, I would borrow my father's video camera and tell stories, often with props but always bossing around my younger sister (aka the lead actress and stagehand) and my impressive range of made up words like 'blustery-er'. It wasn't until I was eleven… Continue reading I’m going to start a blog. How hard can it be?